Juggling multiple POV characters? Do THIS!

Congratulations! You’ve gone and done a heroic thing and put multiple heroes in your book. As the saying goes: two heroes (or three or four or…) are better than one.  Yes, I’m paraphrasing a tad.  My point is, you have a big, beautiful, complex book – more than likely part of a series – and you’ve woven together a rich tapestry of personalities, quirks, talents and phobias in the form of multiple point-of-view characters.  You’ve got guts, and you’re in good company.  Continue reading

Pitch Wars Young Adult Mentors Handy MSWL

So, I did a thing….

If you are a hopeful Pitch Wars mentee for Young Adult/New Adult, and you haven’t already picked out your Most Wanted Mentors, then do I have a helpful list for you!  I had the day off (courtesy a left eye surgery – thanks, early onset cataracts!) and spent the parts of it when I wasn’t napping with bandages packed over my eye browsing through the mentor blogs.  The intent was to make a reference of all the mentors taking YA Fantasy, as that’s my entry this year.  But then, one thing led to another, and wouldn’t you know it….I now have a full list of all the mentors with the major genres they are slobbering for this year!

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A Word on Whores

That’s an attention-grabbing, click-bait headline if ever there was one. But lucky for you, I’m not going to try to sell you anything.  Okay, that’s actually a lie. Eventually, I want to sell you my book once I get it out there, but you have some time before you are contractually obligated to me for clicking on my headline. Anyway, for better or worse, the headline IS an accurate description of what I want to talk about.  Whores.  I seem to be running into a lot of them lately.

In the books I’m reading, that is.

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Kick-Ass Women and the Woman Who Loves Them

Somewhere between the ages of 5 and 10, I had a bracelet. Well, to be honest, my oldest sister had the bracelet. I just borrowed it on occasion. It was a cuff-type bracelet; about two inches wide in faux silver finish and open in the back so you could squeeze your wrist into it.  Whenever I managed to get my grubby childhood paws on the bracelet, this magical thing would happen where I would throw my arms out and spin in place in a circle.  And then, miraculously, I could stop bullets with that bracelet. And hop into a jet that no one else could see and fly away to rescue mankind.

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The Inner Worlds of a Writer

I have a rich inner world. A treasure chest of stories in my head. A personal copy of a “1001 Arabian Nights”-type book in which I write all the tales.  No big deal, right?  I’m a writer. All writers have thriving imaginations.  It’s what makes us able to create the stories people want to read.

And I supposed that’s how everyone’s inner life worked. We create great works of fiction – sometimes contemporary, sometimes sci-fi or fantasy (mine are nearly all sci-fi and fantasy…) – in our heads. Everyone amuses themselves with reimagined movie plots, book retellings, and original stories when they have time to think aimlessly, right? I assumed as much, until I had a discussion about it with my husband one night.

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My First Flash Fiction Piece

So I did it.  I finally tried a bit of flash fiction for an online contest.  The prompt was the line, “Take a chance on me.”  Below is the result:

A Chance by DM Domosea

(submitted for the August 28 Operation Awesome Flash Fiction #19 contest. No winner selected for that round.)

Her lips part, soft and beckoning.

“Take a chance on me.”

Her call surrounds you and lifts you from a deep sleep. You open your eyes. It’s late. The full moon drenches your room in blue light. Within it, you watch yourself dress, a detached observer. You walk out your door, down the staircase and across the empty lobby to the heavy wood doors.

“Take a chance on me.”

Yes, I am coming.

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Dear Important Minor POV Character

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Dear Important Minor POV Character,

It has come to my attention that, despite the epic fantasy genre of my latest work, it is not advisable to have more point-of-view characters than George R. R. Martin has dead ones. In an effort to bring my POV character count down to a more respectable and manageable number, I must enact austere measures. After careful review of all characters who have provided their viewpoints in various sections of my manuscript, I regret to inform you that I will be cutting your position as a POV character.

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A Captain’s Call to Duty

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Vacation was officially over.

“Papa, there’s a ‘bout in the driveway.” A young girl peered out the kitchen window as she handed a plate dripping with suds and water to the girl next to her.

“And it has the Imperial Guard emblem on the doors,” the second girl added, drying the plate with a towel before placing it in the cupboard next to her. She was identical to the first girl: the same soft brown hair and thick eyebrows that furrowed over sky-blue eyes. They both looked distressed over the rideabout’s appearance outside.

Tolman Bootka emitted a raspy sigh through his nose. A twelve-week leave of absence apparently didn’t entail a full ninety days of being left alone. One of the few benefits of serving in the Imperial Guards was that it allowed Tolman to take extended periods of leave to spend with his children on Dometia Lesser while earning a full-time salary.  His career choice didn’t make him rich, but it provided a good, modest life on the vacation continent for his family.  He planned to retire here after the obligatory twenty years of service to run a water glider shack on the beach and chase grandkids around on the black sand shores. If guard service remained the uneventful career it proved to be thus far, only eight more lackluster years lay ahead of him.

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Of Terms and Titles

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YA Book Title Wordle

Last week, I bombarded you with a mega-ton of angst over the title of my Young Adult fantasy manuscript. The bottom line on that post? In its querying stage, the importance of a clever book title is insignificant compared to other aspects of the project (i.e., is the plot interesting and fresh? Is it well-written?), but a catchy, solid title can impart confidence to the querying writer in the marketability of their project. It might also show prospective agents and editors that the writer knows the category/genre well enough to choose a title that’s in line with market trends.

Now, about those trends…

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